Insurance

Introduction

Many people who head to France and the Continent believe that the level of car insurance they currently enjoy in the U.K automatically extends to driving within Europe. This is actually not the case. A large number of car insurers only provide the minimum cover required by law in the Country you're driving in. So if you have fully Comprehensive insurance in the U.K, this does not necessarily mean you'll have fully Comprehensive cover in France, more likely Third Party Fire and Theft. This could prove to be an expensive shock should you be involved in an accident.

At least one month before your trip, contact you current Car Insurance provider to find out what cover they automatically offer. For short trips, some insurers will offer you the chance to enjoy the same level of cover driving on the Continent that you get in the U.K, often at no extra charge.

Do I need a Green Card?

Green cards may be issued by your insurance company if you are travelling abroad. A green card is simply a document which is internationally recognised by all European countries, but is not mandatory when crossing borders within the European Union. The Green card by itself does not offer insurance cover, it is a widely recognised document which proves that the minimum legal requirements for 3rd party liability insurance in any country for which the Green Card is valid are covered by the insured's own motor policy. When travelling within France, Belgium or any other EU Country the advantage of the Green Card is simply that it is more widely recognised than a U.K motor insurance certificate. Therefore, it is best to contact your insurance provider to ask if they will be issuing a Green Card. If you are not taking a Green Card with you (and even if you are), ensure that you take your Motor Insurance Certificate and log book with you.